Conference Coverage

Social activities may offset psychosis risk in poor communities


 

FROM ASCP 2022

Interesting, innovative

Nagy Youssef, MD, PhD, director of clinical research and professor of psychiatry, Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, said the study suggests “social engagement may reduce the negative effect of poverty in this population, and if replicated in a larger study, could assist and be a part of the early intervention and prevention in psychosis.”

director of clinical research and professor of psychiatry, Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus Ohio State University

Dr. Nagy Youssef

Overall, “this is an interesting and innovative study that has important medical and social implications and is a good step toward helping us understand these relationships and mitigate and prevent negative consequences, as best as possible, in this population,” said Dr. Youssef, who was not part of the research.

The analysis was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study. Dr. Ku and Dr. Youssef report no relevant financial relationships.

A version of this article first appeared on Medscape.com.

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